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Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)
love this, as opposed to letting the government do it. we he don't need the government to do this. this is what americans can do. stuart: you've got the last word on me there, mark lanier, very good, very good. you walk away from your 227 million, mark, have a wonderful new year. >> thank you. stuart: a massive storm, serious stuff here, big storms through the u.s., high winds, snow, everybody came down and stranding a lot of travelers across the country and dumping inches of snow in some cities, actually feet in some areas. roadways in the northeast covered with snow, again, two feet of snow in some areas. big delays in a lot of airports. big headaches for holiday travelers, that storm is blamed for the at least six deaths. if congress and the president can't come up with a plan and we dive on that fiscal cliff, look what would happen to the average federal taxpayers, the average taxpayer is roughly 50,000 bucks a year and that person would pay a extra, 1238 per year in taxes. in fact, every taxpayer would pay more if we go over that cliff. clearly, that would be a hit to the ove
thing the next government needs to do is actually nothing. if it does nothing, if it doesn't reverse the reforms -- >> what's interesting is what berlusconi is campaigning on is austerity. he's running on an ant anti-austerity pro eu package. while it's untenable, it does have a certain amount of certainly backtracking the fiscal returns for them. >> exactly. this property tax, i think that's a cause for concern. if you were to repeal that, the fiscal position on would be unsustainable and he would have to raise taxes elsewhere to make up for that. that would be some messy negotiations with him on a european level. markets would be very concerned already heading into the elections. the more noise we hear, the higher italian borrowing costs would be and if italian borrowing costs rise, one of the very important parameters which led to this drop in debt to gdp over these 15 years heading into the crisis would not be fulfilled any more and italy's position would be unsustainable because of all that noise. >> it sounds like a catalyst should this fall into place in 2013. that still remai
difficult for the federal government. people are wary of all of the uncertainty. they are keeping their pocketbooks closed during this all-important spending season. do you see that as an interesting perspective? >> i think at this point, here you have this santa claus rally which is a market phenomenon that makes sense until it doesn't. that works until it doesn't. coming into this season we would have a typical 1.7% increase in the s&p 500. now, we are dealing with questions that will remain unanswered until january. that uncertainty makes investors anxious. tracy: we have for trading days left. what should we be doing? what should people be doing over the course of the next couple trading days? >> i think people should really look at their capital gains. we are at a point now where capital gains is going up. it makes sense to take him and reposition them when we find out what will happen. lori: i have to tell you, i think stocks are the place to be. stocks, even emerging market stocks, there is a lot of strategy. how would you recommend it? >> i think equity because bond yields
are again here like we were for the debt ceiling, like we were for the government shutdown. it is ridiculous that we are here because we want to be having a big discussion. we have all the facts in front of us. we know that there are people like you kwhof a position on taxes. we know there are others who have positions on other things. and our democracy is supposed to allow us to somehow come to together, to convene, to deliberate and to evolve some sort of a compromise. what response -- what responsibility do you think conservative republicans who have signed this pledge to grover norquist bear for us getting to where we are today? >> well, actually, let me defend grover for a second. >> sure. >> he actually has signed on to some kind of a deal. we're in a situation that if nothing happens taxes go up on everyone. so -- and then a guy like me doesn't want to see that happen obviously. look, i want to make one other point. even if we go over the so-called cliff, and i think cliff is a bad metaphor here, really kind of a slope. it's not like the world's going to come to an end january 1st or
to the president's desk. tracy: click and expedient. lori: the efficiency. tracy: u.s. government set to hit the legal borrowing limit on monday. 16.$4 trillion federal debt limit beginning to come down and toch congress passes legislation or defaults. treasury secretary tim traders said the treasury would begin to undertake "extraordinary measures to stave off default quote that could $3,200,000,000,000 of additional funding which would give them two more months this is creative accounting. we have many. lori: the overspending is the understatement. the bond yield is lower investors are thinking this is the safest bet stocks are falling the dow was off 100 points europe is a mess in china slows down the global economy in dire straits and we cannot stop spending there is no message in interest rates are rising as they should to prepare for another downgrade which is very concerning talking about the economic data data, consumer confidence falls over fiscal cliff uncertainty and warning the government is set to hit the legal borrowing limit by a monday. we have bill rodgers from rutgers unive
that governing is a shared responsibility between both parties in this congress laws can only pass with support from democrats and republicans, and that means nobody gets 100 percent of what they want. lou: there are only ten days remaining tothe fiscal cliff. president obama headed to value within actually minutes, and members of congress have also gone home for chrrstmas vacation already. in a news conference today, speaker boehner admitted negotiations wh the president ha, indeed, been difficult. >> until the president on monday, these are my bottom lines. the president told me that his numbers, $1 trillion in new revenues, 850 billion in spending cuts was his bottom-line. he could not go any further. lou: and he didn't. the plan be option collapsing last night when he failed to get republican support to raise taxes on only those making more than a million dollars a year. over in the senate majority leader harry reipounced on the very public embarrassing defeat. >> we knew the so-called plan b was no plan at al. it could not pass the senate. it turns out, it could not pass the house either.
on go bankrupt or the governments they are based on go bankrupt, and people are saying that might happen here. >> you could have a credit incident, but we're not going to destroy the faith in credit of the u.s. government. david: we already have. are you kidding, larry? we already have. >> i doubt it because, really, if the credit were destroyed, the cost of finance at the margin would be going up, and the cost of finance at the margin for the federal government is going down. >> larry, consumers are pulling back, a consumer that's pulling back, not spending as much, that is not going out and driving and consuming oil, the confidence seems eroded before a decision is made in dc. we don't even need a decision. david: larry, i know what you say about interest rates, overriding factor thinking about investment and how much cash, but, again, right for now, our credit rating is the best in the worlding but it's a lousy world of credit. that's the problem is that with all this money printing going on around the world, i'm wondering when that comes back to bite us. >> well, that's why you don't
up on all american taxpayers and hundreds of billions of dollars in automatic government spending cuts will kick in. potentially plunging the economy back into recession. after the boehner plan fails stock markets around the world reacted and reminded the president, congress, and the senate that morefalures of leaders and failures to reach compromise in washington will have on peasant and possly exceedingly painful consequences wall street today sold off sharply despite more positive news on an ecnomy that is now obviously growing and building momentum. the dow jones industrial fell 121 points. the s&p down 39 and a half, nasdaq lost 29 points to assess what is now a bright new economic prospects and the consequence of further gathering in irresponsibility in washington, we are joined by economist john lonski, noted fund manager and strategist harvey eisen, and in other news fromwashington tonight president obama nominating senator john kerry to be the next secretary of state with their views on kerry, benghazi, obama's foreign policy. we will be talking with fox his national secu
happens january 1st. here's why they get sales from government contracts. that's the deal. it's not just the lockheed martins of the world. you'll see in here, humana, other health care companies, of course, medical device companies hit with the tax, but they have striker, for example, and there's a lot of sales from government contracts. you'll see in here, look at that, motorola, holdings in and waste management companies like waste management and republic services, ashley. ashley: what are the stock prices on the companies, iz? >> good point. goldman sachs warned since 2011 when that debt ceiling crisis hit in the summer of 2011 that triggered the fiscal cliff learning that the companies could under perform, but there's another wall street player, and that's fidelity saying watch for the banks, not just because they are under pressure as they track the general economy, but it's because business capital spending is down as of the third quarter, really went south, worried about that and activity dropping off by 20% versus the prior year, and banks make a lot of fee money. people, you k
the world. look at japan and europe. the japanese government is the glaring war on japanese citizens. it will create inflation. if the japanese citizens start to dump their bonds, they have been a bigger part then japan recently. that is a big problem for us. their euro has been quietly depreciating. if that goes out, that is a much bigger fiscal cliff. if the buyers of treasuries become sellers. liz: there are a lot of "if" in your discussion. the bond markets are still pretty -- nothing from the bottom vigilantes yet. you were a clinton advisor. you saw in the mid- 90s bond yields really spike higher. that is the issue. if we see the economy healing, bond yields could go up. investors say, wait a second, why invest for bond. >> that is the key issue. we have not seen interest rates spike for a simple reason. nobody has confidence in the economy. nobody believes we will have robust economic growth. we could be heading towards a recession. especially given the disappointing christmas sales. i am frankly skeptical about what will happen with our economy either way. i think we will go
geithner says the government will hit the debt ceiling on monday and he is launching an emergency plan to avert a crisis. amm eamon javers is live. what do we know? >> the president is coming back early, a couple days earlier than his vacation. did a little bit of jogging, working out in the gym over his vacation. now he will be,ing would out on this fiscal cliff. the senate is coming back and the house of representatives is going to have a conference call for all republicans later on today and then yesterday, we saw the secretary of the treasury, tim geithner, announced the $16.4 trillion debt limit is going to be reached by monday, that was a little bit surprising to people who haven't been following this kind of thing and raises the stakes for the fiscal cliff end game because the white house had wanted a debt ceiling deal as part of the overall deal here on the fiscal cliff. republicans have been resisting that by announcing the debt ceiling limit will be held on monday, ratchets up the pressure to include the debt ceiling piece in the final package, whatever that may be, but still
fiscal cliff deal. meantime, treasury warns the government will hit its legal borrowing limit by monday. it's thursday, december 27th, 2012 and "squawk box" begins right now. >>> good morning and welcome to "squawk box" here on cnbc. i'm andrew ross sorkin along with joe kernen. becky continues to have the day off today. our guest host today is bob broska. house speaker john boehner urging the senate to come up with a passable fiscal cliff solution. he's promising to at least consider any bill that the upper chamber produces. senate majority leader harry reid now expected to base any legislation on a bill passed earlier this year to continue tax breaks for households will incomes below $250,000. a senate bill would likely contain an extension of expiring unemployment benefits. and the other big news of the morning, treasury secretary tim geithner unveiling a plan to buy time under the debt ceiling. in a letter to congress, geithner saying that treasury is going to begin taking steps this week to delay hitting the government's 16$16.4 trillion borrowing limit. treasury will tak
is not the right solution. we can still count on government to disappoint us each and every time that we need their support, that's a beginning, yet we've had two 10% corrections already this year in stocks, including dividends. they are up close to 14%, and this type of environment, where you're probably going to see another 3% to 5% selloff because of this fiscal announce, fiscal irritation, and when you get that, you should take that money and put it to work. simply because when you look at corporate america, the average company, bill, is generating a 16% to 17% return on equity, record free cash margins and a federal reserve that has the pedal to the metal. what you and i have talked about before repeatedly, $4 in taxes for every dollar in phantom spending cuts. that's fiscal irritation, but the health of corporate america will be what ultimately prevails. >> sounds like david has been reading your book, rick santelli. >> it does. >> big fan of rick. >> this is such a perverse world we live in, okay. let's look as what's happening. down 158 in stocks and that pushed the ten-year yield und
value, at the turn of the 20th century where government spending was 9% of gdp, we're now at 25%. there are some that say, take what we give you and retrofit government to the size of 19% or 20%. do that first. he just wants to shrink what it's grown to, this unwielding federal government that -- don't you think 25% needs to come down? >> well, part of that is cyclical. >> okay. so at 3%? >> 21, 22. >> i would say 22. >> so we have to get it down to 20.5. >> the three big beasts in the budget remain medicare/medicaid, social security and defense. you have to cut almost everything else to zero to get close to balance or to make a big difference. so i think in today's world, given that those entitlements, even if you reform them and cut back back will increase as people like us eventually retire. it seems to me that sizing the government for something around 22 or so is probably doable. but not easy to get to. because you still have to have major cuts and major long titlement reform to get there. >> you see one of the major ceo guys, and i'm not going to quote which one, said yest
in india. the indian government looking into whether wal-mart's lobbying activities in the u.s. violated indian laws. shares of wal-mart closed fractionally higher. smith and wesson is buying back an additional $15 million worth of stock, on top of the $20 million repurchase program it recently completed. smith and wesson's shares have fallen nearly 10% since the newtown connecticut shootings. investors bought up gold today, as a safe place to park money while washington lawmakers spar over the fiscal cliff. the precious metal settled $3 hier at $1,663 an ounce. gold prices are on pace for an annual rise of about 6%, the smallest annual gain since 2008. and, supply concerns pushed palladium prices to a nine-month high. investors are worried that tight supplies from the world's top two producers and steady demand from the auto sector could mean higher prices in 2013. it settled at $708 an ounce: over the past year the metal has rising about 7.5%. and finally, for the second day in row the ishares emerging market e.t.f. ended higher. and that's tonight's "market focus." >> susie: once upon
government bailout than meets the eye. liz macdonald tells us the white house is backing a plan to help out underwater mortgages and not just for government underwritten loans. shibani: let's take a look if you own these stocks on the nasdaq you are making money today. research in motion, netflix, a lot. dennis: the christmas movie box office cannot non-violent are rated westerns by quentin tarantino against a broadway musical based on a nineteenth century novel, was miserables and the musical won. universal's less miserables broken 18.one million dollar guarantees, tarantino break-in $15 million, the highest level christmas opening for and are rated film. elsewhere taylor swift is breaking up with stream music services. turn newest album read finished fifth week at number one but she refused to make it available on internet streaming services that the attendees her songs. other music acts may take notice. a great story in the wall street journal. an office building, number one times square, the bad news, it is mostly vacant. the good news is it brings in $23 million a year in ad revenue on
cliff, so note to the government. it does matter. >> yeah, but that's, as you say, part of it. laura, what else is going on? it just felt like we were going into a lackluster season here. what happened? >> i mean, there's been some discussion about weather trends as well, but whether or not we go over the fiscal cliff, consumers think next year we'll see higher taxes and lower entitlements. the only place in our space where we see a very significant fiscal cliff hit is aspirational customer, so the step-up customer into low-end tiffany's jewelry, for example, we just don't think they showed up this year. >> even if people, stacy, are going to be hit by higher taxes next year, at least some people are going to be hit by higher taxes next year, a lot of this is psychological, isn't it. you turn on the tv and you're feeling spooked, right? and once we have a deal or resolution, uncertainty taken away, will people unleash their spending? will this be unlocked? >> i think at the high end, yes, there will be some relief, and, you know, to laura's point, we were in tiffany over the weekend,
crisis we've had in our government over the past three years. we push, push it, push it to the brink and come up with something. i'm not sure we'll come up with something now. there is let more flexing. congress meeting on monday is a help thulful thing. if they come up it will be minor framework of what we see next year. we'll see where it goes from there. ashley: very good point. mike, from the nymex, what about oil today. what have we seen in the action of the oil trade? >> it is more or less follow the leader after we came out with that little stock market rally there i'm looking at the board here we're pushing highs at 91.25. it is more like a vooleyball game. who's serve is it not? it is going back and forth in washington on what kind of plan we'll come up with. i wouldn't be, the volume's been low. i don't think we'll miss a huge move. i've been saying buy 85, sell 90. probably drift a little higher until the end of the year and see what happens going into the new year. ashley: so much uncertainty. thank you so much, gentlemen. we have ben and daniel and mike, thank you for jo
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government because it is potentially dangerous to the environment. that is nothing like a danger to oil trading that the fiscal cliff is now causing. take a look at prices. you said today, we've got back a little bit and pulled back a little bit after run-up yesterday. this is not a story about price. this is a story about volume, lack of volume. take a look at the volume of oil trading on the most traded contract, wti, that's west texas intermediate at the cme group, if february of 2011 the volume was 934,000 contracts a day. almost a million contracts a day. by november of this year, a month ago, got half of that. yesterday the volume was 175,000. oil money is on the sidelines. our producer just gave me the latest volume today. trading is going to continue only for another 15 minutes or so. 273,000 contracts traded just today. that is half of the typical volume. people are so scared about the fiscal cliff, this money, david, now is sitting on the sidelines and doing nothing for investors. that is what the fiscal cliff has wrought in the oil market. david: jeff, one of the problems of
russia's accession to the world trade organization. the amendment which had govern the a lot of u.s.-russian/soviet relations going back to the 1970s had to be replaced. it was replaced in congress by the act which set russia's worst human viets violators there should be consequences when it comes to getting visas. vladimir mute indecided to lash out to the united states by pointing a figurative rifle at the head of russia's orphans. >> we improve russia's trade relation with us, officially and then he gets upset because buried within there is a little clause that says, as you point out, the worst human rights violators should have trouble getting into the united states. how far should we go, throw, right? i brought this up last night and i'll bring it up again with you. in the united states we believe that people all over the world have certain rights regardless of geography, regardless of ethnicity, regardless of religion. they are inalienable and it is unfathomable to us that there are parts of the world where they don't believe that. it's amazing, but true. how far do we go in
has, they won't have anymore, and they won't have the government assistance programs to rely on. may not have the same effect we saw in the last recession. >> the ultimate consumer discretionary stocks, it occurs to me, dana, would be the luxury retailers like a tiffany which have suffered here recently. they in the past have been immune to a lot of vagaries of the consumer and the economy, but that hasn't been the case this time around. what happened? >> i think tiffany's a little bit different than some of the other luxury goods company. tiffany overall is working on its product, silver business which is a high margin category. didn't have enough novelty and newness in it and hopefully that's something they can fix for next year. >> wasn't just me then? >> not just you. >> exactly. >> i noticed that, yeah. >> dana on that point, the companies for stocks like tiffany's, what about aptitude in places like china in. >> overall when we see what's happening in china, so many new brands emerged in china, new companies on the luxury good fronts, and you've had the big conglomerates vogue
Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)

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